Editors

Since the inception of the endeavor that would become the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Project, an Editorial Board appointed by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the United States has actively directed the diverse aspects of the project. In the period from 1995 to 2008, the following individuals, as members of the Editorial Board, guided the undertaking through several distinct phases, culminating in the development of this website.

Larry Bucknell
has a long record of experience in business management and publishing, including several years as the General Manager of the Bahá’í Publishing Trust in Wilmette, Illinois. He became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1984.
 

Betty J. Fisher
holds a PhD in medieval English literature from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She has taught at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; the University of Nebraska, Lincoln; and Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut. From 1971 through 1995 she was the General Editor of the Bahá’í Publishing Trust in Wilmette, Illinois, where she edited award-winning books and helped expand the quality and scope of the Trust's publications. She is cocompiler of Peace: More than an End to War (2007) and Life, Death, and Immortality: The Journey of the Soul (2006). Dr. Fisher has served on the Editorial Board of World Order magazine since 1968 and has been its managing editor since 1999. She is a member of the Administrative Board of the Wilmette Institute, an educational agency of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the United States. She became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1984.

 

Firuz Kazemzadeh
is Professor of History, Emeritus, at Yale University. Born and educated in Moscow, he holds a master’s degree from Stanford University and a PhD in Russian history from Harvard University. At Yale Professor Kazemzadeh served at various times as director of graduate studies in the Russian and East European Studies Program and in the Department of History and as Master of Davenport College. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, Lewis and Clark, and the University of Southern California Law School. The author and coauthor of books on Russian history and the history of Iran—among them, The Struggle for Transcaucasia, 1917–1921; Russia and Britain in Persia: A Study in Imperialism, 1864–1914; and the section on Russo-Iranian relations in The Cambridge History of Iran—he has written articles and reviews that have appeared in numerous publications, including the American Historical Review, the New Republic, the New York Times Book Review, and World Order, of which he was editor from 1966 to 2000. He served two two-year terms as a member of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom. From 1963 to 2000 he was a member of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the United States. He became a member of the Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1984.

 

Todd Lawson
is Associate Professor in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto, where he teaches Islamic Thought. He holds an MA and a PhD from McGill University. His first area of interest is Qur'an commentary: at the Institute of Islamic Studies at McGill, his two graduate theses treated problems in the interpretation of the Qur'an, and his doctoral research was on the Qur'an commentary of the Báb. Professor Lawson’s edited volume Reason and Inspiration in Islam, a collection of articles by leaders in the field of Islamic intellectual history, appeared in 2005. His The Crucifixion and the Qur'an: A Study in the History of Muslim Thought was published by Oneworld early in 2009. He has written articles on the Bahá’í Faith and related topics for the Encyclopaedia Iranica, the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World, and the Encyclopaedia of Islam. An invited lecturer and visiting scholar in leading universities around the globe—among which are the Australian National University, American University Beirut, the Sorbonne, Oxford University, University of London, Université Marc Bloch (Strasbourg), the Center for Islamic Studies (Damascus), and the Institute of Ismaili Studies—he was the first research director for the Association for Bahá’í Studies, 1986–88. He became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1989.

 

Heshmat Moayyad
is Professor of Persian Language and Literature in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago, where he has taught since 1966. Born in Iran, he studied at the University of Tehran and holds a PhD from the University of Frankfurt, where he studied Persian literature, Islamic studies, and German. He has also taught at Harvard University, the Instituto Universitario Orientale in Naples, Italy, and the University of Frankfurt. His research interests range from medieval Sufi literature to twentieth-century Persian poetry and prose, the Bahá’í poetry of Iran, and nineteen- and twentieth-century Iranian culture. A translator as well as an author, he has authored, coauthored, and edited many books and scores of book chapters, essays, articles, and reviews in English, Persian, and German. He became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1984.

 

Gayle Morrison
became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1995 and the coordinating editor of the Encyclopedia Project in 1996. She studied history and Southeast Asian studies (Yale Graduate School, 1968–69) and holds a master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (1970). The author of To Move the World: Louis G. Gregory and the Advancement of Racial Unity in America (1982), a work she is currently revising and enlarging, she has published articles and lectured on race relations, education, history, and gender issues. From 1969 to 1972 she served on the editorial board of World Order magazine. She was named the Hasan M. Balyuzi Lecturer by the Association for Bahá’í Studies in 1982. A resident of Hawaii for many years, she has also lived in Vietnam, Brazil, and New Zealand. From 1985 to 1995 she traveled extensively as a member of the Continental Board of Counselors in Australasia, which advises Bahá’í communities throughout the Pacific.

 

Sholeh A. Quinn
is Associate Professor of History in the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts at the University of California, Merced. She received her PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 1993. She taught courses on the Middle East and Central Asia in the Department of History at Ohio University from 1994 to 2008. Professor Quinn specializes in the history and historiography of Safavid Iran and has given lectures and papers on these and related topics at conferences and seminars in the United States and Europe. She is the author of Historical Writing during the Reign of Shah ‘Abbas: Ideology, Imitation, and Legitimacy in Safavid Chronicles (2000) and Shah ‘Abbas (forthcoming from Oneworld) and has written many articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries. She is the coeditor of History and Historiography of Post-Mongol Central Asia and the Middle East: Studies in Honor of John E. Woods (2006). She became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1998.

 

Martha L. Schweitz
holds a JD degree from New York University School of Law (1981). After several years with a large legal firm in Chicago, she taught international and corporate law at the University of Oregon (1986–89). Having moved to Japan as a Fulbright Lecturer, she was appointed to the Law Faculty of Seinan Gakuin University in Fukuoka (1990–2000). She has also been a Visiting Professor at Chicago–Kent College of Law and a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University Center of International Studies. Her coedited book (with Tatsuro Kunugi), Codes of Conduct for Partnership in Governance, was presented to the World Civil Society Conference (Montreal, 1999), for which she served on the steering committee. With a primary research focus on the relationship between civil society and intergovernmental institutions, she has published articles and lectured on global governance, accountability, international organizations, international human rights, gender equality, and Bahá'í law. She is Director of the Office of Review at the United States Bahá'í National Center. Since 2001 she has served on the Executive Committee of the Association for Bahá'í Studies—North America. She became a member of the Bahá'í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 2003.

 

Robert H. Stockman
obtained his master's degree and doctorate in Religious Studies from Harvard University, where he specialized in the history of religion in the United States.  He is the author of The Bahá'í Faith in America, volumes 1 and 2, which cover Bahá'í events in North America from 1892 to 1900 and 1901 to 1912, respectively; Thornton Chase: The First American Bahá'í; many articles on Bahá'í history and theology; and numerous encyclopedia articles on the Bahá'í Faith, including articles for the Bahá'í Encyclopedia Project. He has lectured on Bahá'í topics across the United States and in Europe, Russia, Ukraine, and Israel and is a frequent contributor to Bahá'í panels at the American Academy of Religion. Since 1990 he has been an instructor of religious studies at DePaul University in Chicago, where he teaches world religions, religion in the United States, and Islam. He has been Director of the Wilmette Institute since 2000 and also serves on the Editorial Board of World Order magazine.  He became a member of the Bahá'í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1995.


Will C. van den Hoonaard
is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada. Born in the Netherlands, he received a PhD from the University of Manchester in 1977. He has authored and edited seven volumes on a wide variety of topics, including The Origins of the Bahá’í Community of Canada, 1898-1948 (1996), and has published or presented some 230 papers and book reviews on areas of qualitative research, research ethics, culture, multiculturalism, crime in Iceland, sociology of religion, Bahá’í studies, human rights, the world of mapmakers, and marine resource management. Professor van den Hoonaard has lectured throughout Scandinavia, Iceland, Slovenia, Switzerland, Andorra, Argentina, China, France, and Australia. In 2006 and 2007 he served as Temporary Advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO) in Brazil. The recipient of numerous awards, he is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow (1970), received the Global Citizen Award from the United Nations Association of Canada (1995), and was named the Hasan M. Balyuzi Lecturer by the Association for Bahá’í Studies (2007). He became a member of the Bahá’í Encyclopedia Editorial Board in 1987 and served as its sociology editor from 1984 to 1991.